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How Much for an Indiana Education?

Believe it or not, the most expensive place to educate a child in Indiana is not in the Indianapolis Public School District or Ft. Wayne, it’s the Hammond Academy of  Math & Science Technology.  According to 2011 state data, Hammond Academy spends nearly $35,000 per student.

In all of calendar year 2011, Indiana’s publicly funded schools received more than $12 billion in state, local and federal taxes.  Divide than up between nearly one million kids in K-12 classrooms and the average cost per student is slightly more than $12,000 each.

In 2011, schools (both traditional public and charter) received $6.5 billion in state money, nearly $4.2 billion in local revenue and $1.3 billion in state assistance.

There 358 public and charter school corporations in the state.

The school corporations with the highest expenditures per student were…

  •         Hammond Academy of Science and Technology – $34,915.
  •         Hope Academy – $18,735.
  •         DeKalb County Eastern School Community District – $21,720.
  •         Muncie Community Schools – $17,761.
  •         School City of East Chicago – $17,423.
  •          Indianapolis Public Schools – $17,052.
  •         Hamilton Community Schools – $17,040.

The school corporations with the lowest expenditures per student were…

  •          Geist Montessori Academy – $6,828.
  •          Stonegate Early Clg HS for Sci/Tech – $6,815.
  •          Renaissance Academy Charter School – $7,099.
  •          Rock Creek Community Academy – $7,110.
  •          Beacon Academy -  $7,696
  •          Signature School – $7,336
  •          Cass Township Schools – $5,884*

*In 2011, Cass Township Schools merged with Dewey Prairie Consolidated Schools to form the new Tri-Towship Consolidated School District.

A complete list of  publicly funded school revenue and expenditures is below.

 

Indiana School costs & expenditures from Abdul-Hakim Shabazz

  • Eric Rasmusen

    Very useful. I’d been wanting to see this information. My school, Lighthouse Christian Academy’s budget/pupil is $5,038. Sending us a voucher student saves the state a lot of money (Monroe County schools spend 10-11,000/pupil).

    Of course, we’d like to spend more! Donations welcomed.

  • ImTheMoron

    What is so sad about this is the author seems to believe that it costs the same to educate every child. Children are exactly the same. They are all the same intelligence. They all come from the same background. They all have access to the same resources at home. Since children are no different than widgets, this post really makes sense to me.

    What exactly did the author mean by “Believe it or not…”?
    Want to reform education? Focus on proven strategies. Implement those and the costs savings will come. That’s probably too much work for a two bit blogger.

  • http://www.facebook.com/AttyAbdul Abdul-Hakim Shabazz

    If you read it, I said these were “average” costs. Of course some students will cost more to educate than others.

  • James Hollowell

    Uh, didn’t Stonegate, a charter high school, close in December 2011 because of funding problems due to their lack of enrollment? They left families scrambling to find schools elsewhere in the middle of school year.

  • republikidd

    Pretty sure any money that’s saved goes back into the pot for all the schools…So now there’s one less student and ~$5000 (90% of the State average) back into the pot. Seems like a win-win to me.

  • http://www.facebook.com/leon.dixon.18 Leon Dixon

    Or, more precisely, fail to instruct-at very high costs.

  • IndyAries

    Who’d a thunk that teaching 2+2=4 would cost so much! I’m quite certain that those who ratified Article 8 of our Indy Constitution back in 1851 never though that such a large amount of money would be needed for public education.

    Yep, the three R’s are quite expensive….but why?

  • http://www.facebook.com/leon.dixon.18 Leon Dixon

    http://hoosiersagainstcommoncore.com/english/professor-sandra-stotsky/ Things are about to get better since kids will be able to go to Purdue with a 7th grade reading level. And, Mitch will have to take them! Great savings in schooling expenses-won’t really need expensive teachers to dumb down to this level-about anyone off the street could handle this.

  • http://www.facebook.com/leon.dixon.18 Leon Dixon

    Everything since 1851 is on the Legislature. As “educatin” lost then focus it came to perform less and less. So, we are now redefining “education” at places like BSU,Purdue, etc via common core so that remedial college courses will be a thing of the past. It is sorta like in the Wizard of Oz, everyone will get a diploma, perforated, on printed on soft paper so as to be of some practical use.